Tag Advertising

Toyota’s Intellegent Typography Experiment

This is a few years old but still pretty cool. Back in 2009 Toyota teamed up with Please Let Me Design to create this IQ Font (above) as a way to promote their new micro-car.

The idea is simple enough but the execution is really nicely done. The designers (Pierre and Damien) worked with Stef van Campenhoudt (driver) and Zachary Lieberman (software developer, using OpenFrameworks) to track the car’s path as a way to draw each letter. The resulting font is clean, quirky with lots of character and classic details. Even the “making of” (below) is fun to watch.

Google Adds Multi-Channel Funnels

Last week Google announced analytical support for multi-channel funnels. This means that you can now see the how users actually get to your product beyond the last click.

It’s long been known in the advertising industry that it takes more than a single exposure to an ad for it to be effective. The same is true online but until now there wasn’t a good place to see how a user came to click on your ad, just that they did. As such all the credit for a successful banner went to the one that led directly to the conversion.

Back when I was designing ads for clients it was hard to back them away from a direct response mentality because direct response was the only way they could prove a campaign was successful. So ads explaining the product or why product X was better, were tossed aside for their “buy now” counterparts.

Gladly, I no longer work on banners but the need to know how and why users are doing what they do is just as important to a website/app as it is for a banner. Data on user activity is essential and data like this is priceless for both sides of the ad industry (merchants and content distributors. If you’re making, designing, or selling ads online this is worth looking into.

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Google’s blog post: Introducing Multi-Channel Funnels: discover untapped opportunities in your conversion path

Using Social Media and a Beard

Sites using social media as a cheap method to both promote and host their videos/photos/etc has been done before, Skittles and Boone Oakley are two mentioned here previously.  Celebrities taking jabs at their image is also not new….but using James Lipton and his beard for PSA’s on mobile harassment is pure genius.  The Give It A Ponder campaign, sponsored by LG, is a mix of TV, print and web promotions all revolving around James’ beard and thinking before texting.

The videos (featuring James Lipton) are campy, creepy, funny and to the point.  The imagery and quirkiness leaves a lasting impression and the copy is so Lipton’esque that everything seems normal yet far from it at the same time.

Carlos is Angry

Stephan and Zoe

Tracy and her beard

The print campaign is also humorous though not as powerful and may be confusing as to what it’s actually for.  Still they’re eye catching and well related to the TV/Videos and Web experience.

The Virgin

Peanut Butter Muffin

Junk Drawers

Source:
AdFreak
Bee

Organic/Viral Marketing

Putting Mother Nature to work for your promotional needs is brilliant.  Keeping PETA happy in the mix is even more impressive.  Before I say more…

In case you skipped the video Eichborn, a book publisher, used flies as moving billboards to promote their exhibit space at the Frankfurt Book Fair.  They glued (via a light wax) ultra-light banners to 200 files and set them out into the wilds of the book fair.   Ingenious in so many ways.

Canned Humor

It’s not often that I notice a banner ad let alone interact with one but this ad for Pringles was well worth my clicks.  The banner was created by Bridge Worldwide and won a 2009 Cannes Cyber Lions Gold.  The concept is simple, provide a silly but catchy image and reward evey interaction with witty copywriting.

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Apple revisits New York Times’ homepage

Apple/New York Times - Ad integration 5-18-2009

Apple/New York Times - Animated - Ad integration 5-18-2009Once again Apple has paired up with the New York Times to create an ad users actually want to see.  This time it’s for a homepage integration/takeover featuring multiple ads all working in unison.  Similar to Apple’s TV ads, this site integration features John Hodgman (PC) and Justin Long (MAC) talking about their differences.  In this case John is commenting on the results of a Forrester Research poll, shown in the ad space above theirs, when two characters from yet another ad space join in on the conversation.  Before they start talking they seemed to fade into the pages background drawing little to no attention.  When the main ad is complete the two secondary ads fade to an unobtrusive white panel with a floating Apple logo.  Allowing those that keep the NY Times open all day (to see news updates) not to be barraged with Apple, Apple, Apple.

Though this isn’t the first time for Apple it’s still worthy of the viral attention is getting/has gotten.  It’s cleanly designed and executed.  Continues the sense of humor that has made these ads a hit for the last few years.  Makes great use of its environment.  It may only run a single day but I’m sure both parties make out as winners each time they meet.




Links:
Apple
New York Times
John Hodgman
Justin Long

Imitation, the Greatest Form of Flattery

Henry Needle & Sons - LogoA few years ago “Henry Needles and Sons” took their tailoring business online.  It was a beautifully crafted site with plenty of video to fill your broadband needs.  They displayed their tailor made outfits that brought style, craftsmanship and the ability to bring everything with you.  Each outfit offered extra large pockets that you could fit all of your digital devices.  Check them out at GreatPockets.com

Well today I came across another beautifully crafted site, this time for a new cell phone.  One that should give the iPhone a run for the money.  The Pomegranate phone is a sharp little all-in-one cell phone, and so much more.  Like Great Pockets, this site offers a great multimedia experience to show you every detail of their product.  One of my favorite features is the HD projector.  Who knew such a small device could project true HD video for all to enjoy.

Pomagranate Phone

Both sites are also fronts for another product altogether.  Great Pockets was Nokia’s ingenious concept site, designed by FarFar, for the release of their N95 cell phone.  There was a tight connection between all the items that you could fit into your Great Pockets pants and all the features of the N95.  The Pomegranate on the other hand has features even the N95 doesn’t have.  As mentioned there is an HD projector….umm hmm.  I will speak no more of the Pom’s featues, go check it out yourself.  Unlike the Great Pockets/N95 promo, the Pom phone is only connected to its true destination by some well written copy.  That destination being Nova Scotia.  Mad props go out to the Nova Scotia board of tourism for giving this stunt a try.

My gripe with the Pom phone site is that once I got to the true site I couldn’t care less what it had to offer.  The giant disconect from an ultra-high-tec phone and the land of Nova Scotia was too much for me.  I assume I’m not alone here.  I also assume this campaign will be less successful then Nokia’s original.  Either way they are both well worth your time.
Links:
Great Pockets – Henry Needle & Sons/N95
Pomegranate Phone – Nova Scotia
FarFar

Advertising that Changed the Nation

Advertising that Changed the Nation

Who doesn’t remember Smokey the Bear, McGruff taking a bite out of crime, or the Crash Test Dummies (not the band)?  These icons of pop culture were all part of the Ad Council‘s public service campaigns.  See these and more from the Ad Council’s 65 years of service at Art Institute of Philadelphia’s exhibit “Advertising that Changed the Nation.”  Which runs from February 11th to April 3rd, 2008 at the Art Institute’s gallery at 1622 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Click here for more info.

The fine image above was done by Ryan Katrina (Neuarmy) of the Neiman Group, whom are underwriting (read: paying for) the exhibit.

Links:
the Ad Council
Art Institute of Philadelphia
Neuarmy
Neiman Group