Category Design

Logorama – more then Oscar worthy

I saw this a few months back, loved it. Last night I happened to flip to the Oscars and caught the animated short category and saw that this was not only nominated but won.  As good as it was I never would have thought it was politically correct enough or wouldn’t be sued to oblivion by all the brand owners of the logos used in the film.  Created by the H5 group out of France, including directors François Alaux & Herve de Crecy.  During their thank you speech they mentioned it too 6 years to make this 6 minute masterpiece.  Followed by the hope to return in 36 years with a full length film.

This is one to be watched multiple times just to soak in all the nuances.  Truly an impressive animation with an excess of personality and sass.

official site

BBC shares their design logic

Good design is transparent. Same is true with technology; the end user doesn’t care how it works just that it does.  Unless you’re a designer or a techie you don’t pay attention to how a site works or it’s design beyond it’s basic aesthetics.  Being both I love how the BBC is offering a behind the scenes peek at how they developed their new Global Visual Language 2.0.  There is some really good thinking in there that could benefit many, many sites.

Using Social Media and a Beard

Sites using social media as a cheap method to both promote and host their videos/photos/etc has been done before, Skittles and Boone Oakley are two mentioned here previously.  Celebrities taking jabs at their image is also not new….but using James Lipton and his beard for PSA’s on mobile harassment is pure genius.  The Give It A Ponder campaign, sponsored by LG, is a mix of TV, print and web promotions all revolving around James’ beard and thinking before texting.

The videos (featuring James Lipton) are campy, creepy, funny and to the point.  The imagery and quirkiness leaves a lasting impression and the copy is so Lipton’esque that everything seems normal yet far from it at the same time.

Carlos is Angry

Stephan and Zoe

Tracy and her beard

The print campaign is also humorous though not as powerful and may be confusing as to what it’s actually for.  Still they’re eye catching and well related to the TV/Videos and Web experience.

The Virgin

Peanut Butter Muffin

Junk Drawers

Source:
AdFreak
Bee

Canned Humor

It’s not often that I notice a banner ad let alone interact with one but this ad for Pringles was well worth my clicks.  The banner was created by Bridge Worldwide and won a 2009 Cannes Cyber Lions Gold.  The concept is simple, provide a silly but catchy image and reward evey interaction with witty copywriting.

Get Adobe Flash player

Some Quick Internet Treasures

by Jorge Colombo - The New Yorker - June 2009Not sure how many people have seen this months The New Yorker magazine’s cover (shown on right).  What looks like a water color painting is really an illustration created on his iPhone.  The app is called Brushes along with a companion app that will provide an animation/video of the process.  The New Yorker’s blog offers more details and a video of the illustration being made using the companion app.

GI never had a reason to go to Gatorade‘s website before but the link was sent to me from a designer friend of mine (Neuarmy).  Once going there it was obvious as to why he shared it.  Sporting the new aesthetic of the Gatorade “G” the site takes it to another level of sophistication rather then pure simplification.  It’s an all Flash site boasting lots of black, simplified layouts, vibrant images and large video headers.  Navigation is through the use of large black and white silhouettes for both the products and the athletes.  Which acts as a great accent to a highlighted item and it’s inline videos.  While you may learn more then you ever needed to about Gatorade check out the site for a great sample of extending a brand’s aesthetic across media.

Another gem sent my way from Neuarmy is by Boone Oakley and their use of YouTube for their website.  Ok, so it sounds a bit like Skittles attempt to use Web 2.0 tools to stitch together a web experience…well this isn’t that.  It’s literally their website embedded in humorous and (a touch) twisted little videos.  Very innovative use of such a common medium and a great way for them to show off their conceptual/strategic muscle.  They also feature some great work from that last few years, I’m sure you’ll recognize a few.  Well worth checking out.





Links:
The New Yorker’s blog
Brushes iPhone App for painting
Gatorade
Boone Oakley
Skittles
Neuarmy

Apple revisits New York Times’ homepage

Apple/New York Times - Ad integration 5-18-2009

Apple/New York Times - Animated - Ad integration 5-18-2009Once again Apple has paired up with the New York Times to create an ad users actually want to see.  This time it’s for a homepage integration/takeover featuring multiple ads all working in unison.  Similar to Apple’s TV ads, this site integration features John Hodgman (PC) and Justin Long (MAC) talking about their differences.  In this case John is commenting on the results of a Forrester Research poll, shown in the ad space above theirs, when two characters from yet another ad space join in on the conversation.  Before they start talking they seemed to fade into the pages background drawing little to no attention.  When the main ad is complete the two secondary ads fade to an unobtrusive white panel with a floating Apple logo.  Allowing those that keep the NY Times open all day (to see news updates) not to be barraged with Apple, Apple, Apple.

Though this isn’t the first time for Apple it’s still worthy of the viral attention is getting/has gotten.  It’s cleanly designed and executed.  Continues the sense of humor that has made these ads a hit for the last few years.  Makes great use of its environment.  It may only run a single day but I’m sure both parties make out as winners each time they meet.




Links:
Apple
New York Times
John Hodgman
Justin Long

Apple’s Pitchfork take-over

Once again Apple has produced an ad that almost becomes part of the page.  I have to give credit to Apple’s ad team for continually producing ads that people want to watch just to enjoy the ad.  Their campaigns are generally catchy, original, play well with others and clearly carries the Apple brand experience.  Apple has done a site take-over before previous with the New York Times and was a huge hit.  This time they put their sites on Pitchfork.com, for the launch of Pitchfork’s redesigned site, integrating their iPod Touch video with Pitchfork’s site navigation.  Below is a video of it for all that missed it (stutters were from my system not the ad itself).

[ Javascript required to view QuickTime movie, please turn it on and refresh this page ]

PS: the QuickTime Embed plug-in was used to display this inline.

Links:
Pitchfork (online music mag)
New York Times
Apple

Imitation, the Greatest Form of Flattery

Henry Needle & Sons - LogoA few years ago “Henry Needles and Sons” took their tailoring business online.  It was a beautifully crafted site with plenty of video to fill your broadband needs.  They displayed their tailor made outfits that brought style, craftsmanship and the ability to bring everything with you.  Each outfit offered extra large pockets that you could fit all of your digital devices.  Check them out at GreatPockets.com

Well today I came across another beautifully crafted site, this time for a new cell phone.  One that should give the iPhone a run for the money.  The Pomegranate phone is a sharp little all-in-one cell phone, and so much more.  Like Great Pockets, this site offers a great multimedia experience to show you every detail of their product.  One of my favorite features is the HD projector.  Who knew such a small device could project true HD video for all to enjoy.

Pomagranate Phone

Both sites are also fronts for another product altogether.  Great Pockets was Nokia’s ingenious concept site, designed by FarFar, for the release of their N95 cell phone.  There was a tight connection between all the items that you could fit into your Great Pockets pants and all the features of the N95.  The Pomegranate on the other hand has features even the N95 doesn’t have.  As mentioned there is an HD projector….umm hmm.  I will speak no more of the Pom’s featues, go check it out yourself.  Unlike the Great Pockets/N95 promo, the Pom phone is only connected to its true destination by some well written copy.  That destination being Nova Scotia.  Mad props go out to the Nova Scotia board of tourism for giving this stunt a try.

My gripe with the Pom phone site is that once I got to the true site I couldn’t care less what it had to offer.  The giant disconect from an ultra-high-tec phone and the land of Nova Scotia was too much for me.  I assume I’m not alone here.  I also assume this campaign will be less successful then Nokia’s original.  Either way they are both well worth your time.
Links:
Great Pockets – Henry Needle & Sons/N95
Pomegranate Phone – Nova Scotia
FarFar

A Visual Explanation of the Credit Crisis

The credit crisis is all over the news. Blame being tossed from one side of the isle to the other. The newspapers and newscasts speak of it regularly but it’s more noise then substance if you don’t understand what they are talking about. So this leaves the simple questions like:

  • How does this happen?
  • What does all this mean?
  • Outside of the hype, how does this compare to other recessions?

Well a number of designers have taken on the task of making all that information digestible, might I say, even interesting. Here are some of the better examples I’ve seen.


The Crisis of Credit Visualized from Jonathan Jarvis

As part of his thesis, Jonathan Jarvis has created this beautifully executed and explains the complexities of what caused the credit crisis in simple clear terms. For more visit: CrisisofCredit.com




Four Bad Bear Markets

A simple chart covering the Crash of 1929 through today’s housing crisis. For more info on the data behind this chart visit dshort.com

Four Bear Markets

Interactive Charts by 26Variable


Using Google’s Motion Charts it allows you to see the market in action in a clear colorful way.

26variables' SP100

Advertising that Changed the Nation

Advertising that Changed the Nation

Who doesn’t remember Smokey the Bear, McGruff taking a bite out of crime, or the Crash Test Dummies (not the band)?  These icons of pop culture were all part of the Ad Council‘s public service campaigns.  See these and more from the Ad Council’s 65 years of service at Art Institute of Philadelphia’s exhibit “Advertising that Changed the Nation.”  Which runs from February 11th to April 3rd, 2008 at the Art Institute’s gallery at 1622 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Click here for more info.

The fine image above was done by Ryan Katrina (Neuarmy) of the Neiman Group, whom are underwriting (read: paying for) the exhibit.

Links:
the Ad Council
Art Institute of Philadelphia
Neuarmy
Neiman Group